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What Aristotle thought about Prevision through Dreams

News: Nov 02, 2016

Aristotle accepts prevision but discards precognition (understood as "veridical knowledge in the present about the future), says Filip Radovic.   Photo: Monica Havström

The Aristotelian treatise De divinatione per somnum (On Prophecy in Sleep) is notoriously difficult to understand and has been frequently discussed since Ancient and Medieval times.

Filip Radovic, researcher at Representation and Reality, has published a new paper "Aristotle on Prevision through Dreams" (Ancient Philosophy, Volume 36, Issue 2, Fall 2016, pp. 383-407) in which he argues polemically against other influential interpretations of Aristotle's view on prevision in dreams. Radovic maintains the view that Aristotle accepts prevision but discards precognition (understood as "veridical knowledge in the present about the future). Radovic also accounts for how chapter 2 in De divinatione per somnum fits in to the treatise as a whole. It is argued that chapter 2 does not regard prevision in any direct sense at all but rather concerns the prerequisites for prevision. Finally, Radovic suggests what particular job the Greek term euthuoneiria is doing in relation to prevision.

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Originally published on: representationandreality.gu.se

Page Manager: Monica Havström|Last update: 1/21/2010
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